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New to Video? 4 Types To Get You Started

Online video is a lot like flossing. It’s something we know we should be doing, but somehow we just don’t seem to get around to it. And much like flossing, the benefits of online video are awesome. Rather than preventing expensive dental work, they can build buzz around your brand, help customers out, and keep you competitive!

For starters, online video is fifty times more likely to show up on the first page of search results compared to text web pages. If that’s not enough to get you interested, then consider that 100 million people are watching at least one video online every day.

I could throw out stats all day, but hopefully you see the value that online video can bring to your business. So if you’re wondering where to start, here are 4 simple online video types you can start shooting today.


1. The Explainer Video

You may not be familiar with the term “explainer video,” but you’ve probably seen one. They’re the 1-2 minute intro videos that businesses place on their homepage to explain their company and how the products or services work. Often they’re animated, but depending on your business and the audience you target, live action can work well too.

Producing a high-quality explainer video can be pricey ($5,000-15,000), but if you’re willing to put in the time and effort, you can create one on your own using resources you have around the office and basic software like PowToon. If you’d rather get some professional help, stop by Video Brewery, ZoomTilt or 50Grove. Just looking for a little inspiration? Visit StartupVideos for a collection of explainer videos from around the web.

2. The Customer Testimonial Video

If you have happy customers, you can shoot a customer testimonial video. Testimonials are a powerful selling tool and when you combine them with video, you’ve got something magical.

To get started, find a local client willing to say nice things about you on camera. Once you have a set of questions together, schedule the interview and show up with the proper video, sound, and lighting gear. And don’t forget to shoot some b-roll, or extra footage, that shows the customer around their home or office using your product or service.

3. The Screencast Video

A screencast is perfect for companies with a website or mobile app. Instead of using screenshots or words to describe your service, you can create a screencast video to show your application in action.

There are several affordable, user-friendly screencast programs out there, including Screenflow (Mac) and Camtasia Studio. You can also try Jing, which is free, but has limited features and editing capability.

4. The Video Blog

A video blog gives you the opportunity to show off your personality and inject some life into your business. Like a regular blog post, a video blog should be used to convey useful, educational material in a fun and engaging format.

Moz does a great job producing video blogs that show off their expertise. Each Friday, they have a video explaining some of the key concepts of SEO and inbound marketing. The series is called “Whiteboard Fridays” and is immensely popular in the industry. With a basic video and lighting package, churning out quality video blog content should only be a matter of coming up with topics to share.

As your video dentist, I’m begging you to get out there and start producing online video content for your business. It might be painful and inconvenient at first, but if you stick with it, I guarantee it will pay dividends.

How are you using online video at your company? Let us know in the comments!

  • http://PetHub.tv Tom Arnold

    This article has encouraged us to increase our video sharing. We some fan videos produced by film students on YouTube and pointed to by PetHub dot TV. We also have an explainer video nested in there somewhere.

    Sharing this as requested in your blog above. -Tom

    • Emma Siemasko

      Hi Tom,

      Thanks for reading. It’s a great idea to increase your video production and sharing. Would love to see your videos. Do you have any tips for finding and working with film students?

      Best,
      Emma